AT130040 large  mid Piloted Parking Made Audi a Showstopper at 2013 CES

 

As 2013 is still in its infancy, Audi has been moving with the momentum of being shot out of a cannon. Firming up their 2013 auto racing plans in December, the month of January has been like a second Christmas for Audi fans. Two world premieres are set for the 2013 North American International Auto Show (the already-announced Audi SQ5 and another product yet released), the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas was a bustling scene for the four-ring auto brand.

Kicking off Monday ahead of CES with the announcement that their Audi TTS self-driving vehicle was granted a license to operate on Nevada roads, the auto company’s presence around the Las Vegas Convention Center display give fans of the brand famous for quattro drive a lot to be excited about this past week. With so many great pieces of future technology inside, Audi displayed new LED lighting, 3-D sound and the hands-free, voice-operated text messaging system set for inclusion on the upcoming Audi A3. However, where Audi stole the 2013 CES was with an exhibit of a working prototype in an outside parking garage.

Demonstrating a concept the brand calls piloted driving, Audi venturing into bold avenues in automotive technology. Piloted driving is actually the integration of driving assist self-driving properties being examined by Audi as ways to improve the experience behind the wheel. Adaptive cruise control, active lane assist and Audi pre sense name products already aiding drivers of the latest premium German branded vehicles by predicting actions on the road. The next monumental display of Audi’s piloted driving is systems that can responsibility assume tasks for brief moments with full autonomy.

 

AT130041 large  mid Piloted Parking Made Audi a Showstopper at 2013 CES

 

When an Audi vehicle fitted with the brand’s concept of piloted driving enters a traffic jam, the technology will bring relief to the taxing ordeal of stop and go driving. Acceleration, braking and steering is electronically-controlled through Audi’s piloted driving to safely guide the vehicle through traffic jams at speeds under 60 kilometers per hour (37.3 miles per hour). Eight ultrasonic sensors, two radar sensors, a laser scanner and a wide-angle camera work together on the piloted driving vehicle scanning the road. Audi’s piloted driving technology in traffic situations is not the only auto brand looking at this problem. Ford Motor Company has been testing a similar system called Traffic Jam Assist Technology with the same objective to improve individual as well as overall vehicle moving patterns.

However, the most buzz in regards to Audi piloted driving is the ability to park itself. Going beyond parallel parking assist systems that Lexus brought to market several years ago, piloted driving can effectively take the driver out of the equation after the program is initiated. In Las Vegas, a specially equipped Audi A7 was guided in and out of parking spots autonomously. Like something you would have seen in a James Bond movie, the procedure behind Audi piloted parking is not out of the scope of modern reality. The Audi A7 piloted driving vehicles was controlled through a central computer transmitting over a wireless connection to precisely guide the car to a free parking space. In this peak into the perhaps not-so-distant future, Audi articulates drivers can operate the piloted parking system through a smartphone or key fob remote control.

Operating in a paradox with less control by the driver is actually more control, Audi’s piloted driving proposes a greatly different luxury car experience. Audi’s case history of bringing bold automotive technology to the premium vehicle marketplace is proven with all-wheel drive and turbodiesel powerplants. After the 2013 CES appearance, we can expect a lot more from the German luxury car magnate.

Information, photo and video source: Audi AG

TTS1 550x366 Autonomous Audi Can Now Legally Roam Nevada Roads

 

It used to a major event in a teenager’s life when they earned their right to drive an automobile on public roads. Though the far-reaching capacity of mobile computer technology for items such as smartphones and tablets have contributed to the open road being less sought-after of today’s youth, it appears soon the an Audi vehicle will decide it can drive itself taking you along as a passenger.

In a recent announcement delivered as part of a presentation at the 2013 Consumer Electronic Show (CES) in Las Vegas, a unique Audi configured with sensors and with the capacity to compute decisions previously left to a motorist has graduated to a pivotal step in advancing driverless cars. The specially equipped Audi TTS becomes the second autonomously piloted vehicle to be rewarded with a “driver’s license” for the state of Nevada. Though technology company Google awarded the first such license to a driverless vehicle, Audi celebrates their vehicle‘s operating permit as being the first acquired by a venture involving direct involvement from an original equipment manufacturer in the automotive sector.

 

TTS13 550x366 Autonomous Audi Can Now Legally Roam Nevada Roads

 

In partnership with Stanford University, Volkswagen Group Electronics Research Lab have jointly outfitted an Audi TTS sports car with self-driving technology initially for a specialized challenge. Taking the vehicle to Pikes Peak Colorado in 2010, the driverless Audi TTS would negotiate the historic and tricky hill climb course. Consisting of 156 turns over a 12.42-mile stretch, the Pikes Peak Hill Climb course has been recorded as a test of drivers and machines since 1916. The pilot-less Audi TTS sports car’s was successful in completing the course in just 27 minutes. Equating to an average pace of 27.6-mile per hour, the Audi TTS mark comes nowhere close to effectively challenging the human-navigated winners for the 2012 Pikes Peak International Hill Climb of this past August. However, this should not take away from the fact the autonomous Audi TTS was nonetheless successful in its 12.42-mile journey.

 

TTS10 550x374 Autonomous Audi Can Now Legally Roam Nevada Roads

 

Through their presentation at the 2013 CES, Audi’s plans for self-piloting driving and parking have become apparent. As the Audi TTS is awarded its license to operate on Nevada public roads, real-world evaluations of the self-driving electronics should produce some of the most desirable data on when some, if not all, elements of this experimental vehicle test bed will influence the next Audi products.

Information, photo and video source: Audi AG, Pikes Peak International Hill Climb